Creditor Superpowers

Not all creditors are created equal.
Some debts are “secured” which means the lender can exercise security rights in collateral you own if you default under the terms of the note.  For example, if you stop making payments on a secured loan, a mortgage lender can foreclose your home, and an auto lender can repossess your car.
Other debts are non-dischargeable in bankruptcy.  A full list of these can be found at 11 U.S.C. § 523(a), but it includes items such as taxes, student loans, debts incurred by misrepresentation and fraud, domestic support, and certain governmental debts, among other things.
Secured debts and non-dischargeable debts are the two most common distinctive classes of debts that people going through bankruptcy are made aware of.  But there are a number of superpowers that certain creditors have over other creditors, and we’re going to go over some of the most pertinent ones here.
Utility Companies – are given special status under 11 U.S.C. § 366, and may discontinue utility services if the debtor does not provide adequate assurance of payment, such as a deposit.  In my experience, requests for deposits have been relatively rare, but they do occur from time to time.
Internal Revenue Service and State Taxing Authorities – in addition to the non-dischargeable and priority status that many tax debts enjoy, taxing authorities are also allowed to file claims in a debtor’s Chapter 13 case for tax debts that arise after the bankruptcy case is filed under 11 U.S.C. § 1305.  For example, John Doe files a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy in 2011 with a 5 year term.  In 2013, John Doe finds that he owes taxes to the IRS for the 2012 tax year.  The IRS can file a claim in John’s existing bankruptcy case and force the debt to be paid in the plan.  On the one hand, this is a good thing, because the tax won’t incur interest while it’s paid in the plan.  On the other hand, it may be difficult for John to fund his plan when it is saddled with the new debt, particularly if John is nearing the end of this plan (no plan can go longer than 60 months, so the later in the plan that this happens, the less time you have to spread the payments out).
Student Loan Creditors – filing bankruptcy can trigger higher default interest rates, which is particularly a problem for Chapter 13 debtors who are not paying off their student loans in full during the Chapter 13 Plan.  Since student loans are currently non-dischargeable (there has been a lot of buzz in Washington lately about possibly amending the bankruptcy code to allow certain types of student loans to be discharged under certain conditions), those post-petition rates continue to be incurred throughout the life of the bankruptcy plan.  Bruning v. United States, 376 U.S. 358 (U.S. 1964).