Temporary Leave of Blog Posts

I’ve taken a side job to work at a haunted house this year.  Had I adequately anticipated the demands of the job and my enthusiasm to volunteer with this crew, I would have done a bunch of blog posts in advance and scheduled them to publish through Halloween.  Alas, I didn’t anticipate those things and I’m knee deep in this project.  Rather than juggle my responsibilities to my clients PLUS work this gig PLUS write a weekly blog on a severely sleep-deprived schedule, I’m just going to put this blog on hiatus until November.  The annual bankruptcy update will be held on November 20, so there ought to be plenty of news and coming updates for me to share with you, including new information regarding the updated forms that go into effect December 1.
Also, because of my obligations to this haunt, there will be a couple of days in October (mostly Fridays) where I’ll be closing the office an hour early so I can get prepped.

Reaffirmations & Credit Reporting – Theory & Practice (Part 2)

Last week, we were discussing reaffirmation agreements in contrast to a “ride-through”; the latter of which is a method of keeping collateral after filing for bankruptcy without assuming the risk of liability on a deficiency balance should you default on the loan in the future, with the only risk being loss of collateral.
We were discussing the two main reasons why people would opt for a reaffirmation agreement instead of doing a ride-through, and having dispensed with the first (less common) reason, let’s continue on to the second more prolific reason…
#2 – Credit Reporting
Conventional wisdom these days suggests that secured creditors will report post-petition payments to credit bureaus if and only if a debtor enters into a reaffirmation agreement.  Creditors argue that if they report payments without a reaffirmation agreement, that they would be in violation of the discharge injunction.
While this may be conventional practice, we want to explore a little deeper to determine what legal responsibilities exist.  To do that, we’re going to try to answer two major questions.

1. If a reaffirmation agreement is not signed, are creditors violating the discharge injunction if they report post-petition payments?

I am unable to find any case law that suggests that making reports of payments to the credit bureaus – in the absence of a reaffirmation agreement – constitutes a violation of the discharge injunction.  And there’s an obvious reason for this – if a debtor makes payments on a ride-through and his payments are being reported – he is getting both the benefit of positive credit reporting AND reduced liability for not having signed a reaffirmation agreement.  Why on earth would he sue for violation of the discharge injunction?

11 U.S.C. § 524(a)(2) is the primary provision prohibiting the commencement or continuation of an action, the employment of process, or an act, to collect, recover or offset any such debt as a personal liability of the debtor”.  It is difficult to imagine how reporting payments that a debtor makes could constitute an act to induce such payments.  The only conceivable issue here is if, during a ride-through, the debtor defaults and then – under the FCRA requirement that credit reporting be done accurately – the creditor reports a missed payment.  That could, conceivably, be considered a discharge violation if the debt was discharged in the absence of a reaffirmation agreement.  But the argument that the reporting of payments received as being a discharge violation is patently absurd.

2. If a reaffirmation agreement is signed, do creditors have an affirmative duty to report post-petition payments?

Simple answer is: NO.  There is no provision of the Fair Credit Reporting Act, nor the bankruptcy code, which imposes an affirmative duty upon any creditor to make reports to the credit bureaus.  This is true, even in cases that don’t involve a bankruptcy case.  Under FCRA, creditors are only obligated to make accurate reports, if they report at all.  There is no authority to compel them to make a report at all.

Failure to report payments does not constitute a violation of the discharge injunction.  See In re Bates, 517 B.R. 395 (Bankr. D. N.H. 2014)In re Manning, 505 B.R. 383 (Bankr. D. N.H. 2014), and In re Estrada, 439 B.R. 227 (Bankr. S.D. Fla. 2010).  (Estrada notes that language in a notice which threatens the suspension of credit reporting for failure to sign a reaffirmation agreement may be an impermissible violation of the automatic stay.)

Special thanks to Hon. Margaret D. McGarity and Atty. Michael J. Maloney for case summaries in Bates, Manning, and Estrada.

Summary

Continuing to make payments on secured loans like home mortgages or auto loans (and non-dischargeable debts like student loans) are a terrific way to reestablish credit history and rebuild your credit score after bankruptcy.  These are pre-existing loans, so there is no need to try to get financing approval despite just having filed for bankruptcy.

A ride-through is a less-risky way to proceed, in that in the event you default on a mortgage or auto loan in the future, you only stand to lose the collateral, and you cannot be held liable for a deficiency balance.

However, most secured creditors – as a policy – refuse to report post-petition payments to credit bureaus in the absence of a reaffirmation agreement (which does leave you potentially liable for a deficiency balance).  Although creditors have no affirmative duty to make reports, even with a reaffirmation agreement, they are not in violation of the discharge if they choose to condition their reporting on a reaffirmation agreement.

15 U.S.C. § 1681s-2 – Relevant Provisions
(a) Duty of furnishers of information to provide accurate information
(1) Prohibition
(A) Reporting information with actual knowledge of errors. A person shall not furnish any information relating to a consumer to any consumer reporting agency if the person knows or has reasonable cause to believe that the information is inaccurate.
(B) Reporting information after notice and confirmation of errors. A person shall not furnish information relating to a consumer to any consumer reporting agency if—
(i) the person has been notified by the consumer, at the address specified by the person for such notices, that specific information is inaccurate; and
(ii) the information is, in fact, inaccurate.
(D) Definition. For purposes of subparagraph (A), the term “reasonable cause to believe that the information is inaccurate” means having specific knowledge, other than solely allegations by the consumer, that would cause a reasonable person to have substantial doubts about the accuracy of the information.
(2) Duty to correct and update information. A person who—
(A) regularly and in the ordinary course of business furnishes information to one or more consumer reporting agencies about the person’s transactions or experiences with any consumer; and
(B) has furnished to a consumer reporting agency information that the person determines is not complete or accurate, shall promptly notify the consumer reporting agency of that determination and provide to the agency any corrections to that information, or any additional information, that is necessary to make the information provided by the person to the agency complete and accurate, and shall not thereafter furnish to the agency any of the information that remains not complete or accurate.
(3) Duty to provide notice of dispute. If the completeness or accuracy of any information furnished by any person to any consumer reporting agency is disputed to such person by a consumer, the person may not furnish the information to any consumer reporting agency without notice that such information is disputed by the consumer.
(4) Duty to provide notice of closed accounts. A person who regularly and in the ordinary course of business furnishes information to a consumer reporting agency regarding a consumer who has a credit account with that person shall notify the agency of the voluntary closure of the account by the consumer, in information regularly furnished for the period in which the account is closed.
(5) Duty to provide notice of delinquency of accounts
(A) In general. A person who furnishes information to a consumer reporting agency regarding a delinquent account being placed for collection, charged to profit or loss, or subjected to any similar action shall, not later than 90 days after furnishing the information, notify the agency of the date of delinquency on the account, which shall be the month and year of the commencement of the delinquency on the account that immediately preceded the action.
(B) Rule of construction. For purposes of this paragraph only, and provided that the consumer does not dispute the information, a person that furnishes information on a delinquent account that is placed for collection, charged for profit or loss, or subjected to any similar action, complies with this paragraph, if—
(i) the person reports the same date of delinquency as that provided by the creditor to which the account was owed at the time at which the commencement of the delinquency occurred, if the creditor previously reported that date of delinquency to a consumer reporting agency;
(ii) the creditor did not previously report the date of delinquency to a consumer reporting agency, and the person establishes and follows reasonable procedures to obtain the date of delinquency from the creditor or another reliable source and reports that date to a consumer reporting agency as the date of delinquency; or
(iii) the creditor did not previously report the date of delinquency to a consumer reporting agency and the date of delinquency cannot be reasonably obtained as provided in clause (ii), the person establishes and follows reasonable procedures to ensure the date reported as the date of delinquency precedes the date on which the account is placed for collection, charged to profit or loss, or subjected to any similar action, and reports such date to the credit reporting agency.
 (7) Negative information
(A) Notice to consumer required.
(i) In general.  If any financial institution that extends credit and regularly and in the ordinary course of business furnishes information to a consumer reporting agency described in section 1681a(p) of this title furnishes negative information to such an agency regarding credit extended to a customer, the financial institution shall provide a notice of such furnishing of negative information, in writing, to the customer.
(ii) Notice effective for subsequent submissions.  After providing such notice, the financial institution may submit additional negative information to a consumer reporting agency described in section 1681a(p) of this title with respect to the same transaction, extension of credit, account, or customer without providing additional notice to the customer.
(B) Time of notice
(i) In general.  The notice required under subparagraph (A) shall be provided to the customer prior to, or no later than 30 days after, furnishing the negative information to a consumer reporting agency described in section 1681a(p) of this title.
(ii) Coordination with new account disclosures.  If the notice is provided to the customer prior to furnishing the negative information to a consumer reporting agency, the notice may not be included in the initial disclosures provided under section 1637(a) of this title.
(C) Coordination with other disclosures. The notice required under subparagraph (A)—
(i) may be included on or with any notice of default, any billing statement, or any other materials provided to the customer; and
(ii) must be clear and conspicuous.
(8) Ability of consumer to dispute information directly with furnisher
(D) Submitting a notice of dispute. A consumer who seeks to dispute the accuracy of information shall provide a dispute notice directly to such person at the address specified by the person for such notices that—
(i) identifies the specific information that is being disputed;
(ii) explains the basis for the dispute; and
(iii) includes all supporting documentation required by the furnisher to substantiate the basis of the dispute.
(E) Duty of person after receiving notice of dispute. After receiving a notice of dispute from a consumer pursuant to subparagraph (D), the person that provided the information in dispute to a consumer reporting agency shall—
(i) conduct an investigation with respect to the disputed information;
(ii) review all relevant information provided by the consumer with the notice;
(iii) complete such person’s investigation of the dispute and report the results of the investigation to the consumer before the expiration of the period under section 1681i(a)(1) of this title within which a consumer reporting agency would be required to complete its action if the consumer had elected to dispute the information under that section; and
(iv) if the investigation finds that the information reported was inaccurate, promptly notify each consumer reporting agency to which the person furnished the inaccurate information of that determination and provide to the agency any correction to that information that is necessary to make the information provided by the person accurate.
(b) Duties of furnishers of information upon notice of dispute.
(1) In general. After receiving notice pursuant to section 1681i(a)(2) of this title of a dispute with regard to the completeness or accuracy of any information provided by a person to a consumer reporting agency, the person shall—
(A) conduct an investigation with respect to the disputed information;
(B) review all relevant information provided by the consumer reporting agency pursuant to section 1681i(a)(2) of this title;
(C) report the results of the investigation to the consumer reporting agency;
(D) if the investigation finds that the information is incomplete or inaccurate, report those results to all other consumer reporting agencies to which the person furnished the information and that compile and maintain files on consumers on a nationwide basis; and
(E) if an item of information disputed by a consumer is found to be inaccurate or incomplete or cannot be verified after any reinvestigation under paragraph (1), for purposes of reporting to a consumer reporting agency only, as appropriate, based on the results of the reinvestigation promptly—
(i) modify that item of information;
(ii) delete that item of information; or
(iii) permanently block the reporting of that item of information.
11 U.S.C. § 524 – Relevant Provisions

(a)(2) A discharge in a case under this title operates as an injunction against the commencement or continuation of an action, the employment of process, or an act, to collect, recover or offset any such debt as a personal liability of the debtor, whether or not discharge of such debt is waived.
(b)(2)(C) Subsection (a)(3) of this section does not apply if an agreement between a holder of a claim and the debtor, the consideration for which, in whole or in part, is based on a debt that is dischargeable in a case under this title is enforceable only to any extent enforceable under applicable nonbankruptcy law, whether or not discharge of such debt is waived, only if—
(1) such agreement was made before the granting of the discharge under section 727, 1141, 1228, or 1328 of this title;
(2) the debtor received the disclosures described in subsection (k) at or before the time at which the debtor signed the agreement;
(3) such agreement has been filed with the court and, if applicable, accompanied by a declaration or an affidavit of the attorney that represented the debtor during the course of negotiating an agreement under this subsection, which states that—
(A) such agreement represents a fully informed and voluntary agreement by the debtor;
(B) such agreement does not impose an undue hardship on the debtor or a dependent of the debtor; and
(C) the attorney fully advised the debtor of the legal effect and consequences of—
(i) an agreement of the kind specified in this subsection; and
(ii) any default under such an agreement;
(4) the debtor has not rescinded such agreement at any time prior to discharge or within sixty days after such agreement is filed with the court, whichever occurs later, by giving notice of rescission to the holder of such claim;
(5) the provisions of subsection (d) of this section have been complied with; and
(6)
(A) in a case concerning an individual who was not represented by an attorney during the course of negotiating an agreement under this subsection, the court approves such agreement as—
(i) not imposing an undue hardship on the debtor or a dependent of the debtor; and
(ii) in the best interest of the debtor.
(B) Subparagraph (A) shall not apply to the extent that such debt is a consumer debt secured by real property.
(f) Nothing contained in subsection (c) or (d) of this section prevents a debtor from voluntarily repaying any debt.
(j) Subsection (a)(2) does not operate as an injunction against an act by a creditor that is the holder of a secured claim, if—
(1) such creditor retains a security interest in real property that is the principal residence of the debtor;
(2) such act is in the ordinary course of business between the creditor and the debtor; and
(3) such act is limited to seeking or obtaining periodic payments associated with a valid security interest in lieu of pursuit of in rem relief to enforce the lien.